06 Playbook

Chapter 6

Focus on service quality above all else

Personalise your playbook

Whether you’re building a service team from scratch or you already consider yourself a pro, we’ve identified some key steps that you can take to drive better customer experiences and maximise growth — starting today.

Whether you’re an established financial services company or a fintech start-up, your customers are demanding higher-quality experiences each and every time they reach out.

Though digitally-savvy newcomers are quickly raising the bar, there are steps every financial company can take — starting today — to deliver better experiences and grow their bottom lines.

In the wake of the $1.2 trillion federal infrastructure bill, government organisations find their digital modernisation efforts robustly funded; however, many leaders are still rethinking the roadmap for transforming the way the public sector engages with the public.

Wherever you fall on the spectrum — launching a CX digital transformation programme from scratch or looking to modernise your current programme — there are steps you can take to drive better customer experiences and improve team efficiency.

The research is in — people want more from their encounters with healthcare providers. It’s simply not enough to strive for a speedy response; patients now expect personalised, 24/7 support across their favourite digital channels.

They’re also less likely to come into the clinic if they don’t have to — telehealth usage rates are 38 times higher than before the pandemic. At the same time, healthcare providers must employ the most advanced security measures to protect patient privacy and ensure compliance with data protection laws and regulations.

Customers today have the power to dictate the rules of engagement when it comes to customer service. And increasingly so, they’re using these experiences to determine which company gets their business.

Whether you’re looking to modernise your support team or already have customer service woven into your DNA, we’ve identified some key steps that your business can take — starting today — to drive better customer experiences and maximise growth.

Never has it been so important for manufacturers to prioritise customer service. Not only are more and more manufacturing companies now selling directly to consumers, but service expectations have also jumped sky high. It’s simply not enough to offer quick answers; customers want and expect the best and they’re willing to go elsewhere if they don’t get it.

Emerging from the pandemic, midsized business leaders are looking to customer service as an opportunity to stand out.

72% agree that customer service is a critical business priority — and with good reason. 61% of customers now say they have higher customer service standards. Whether you need to scale your support operation alongside a growing customer base or are looking to match the experiences delivered by larger firms, we’ve identified some key steps you can take to turn high-quality customer service into your competitive advantage.

The pandemic may have rewritten the rulebook on retail, but in doing so it created lucrative opportunities for retailers to grow their business and their bottom line.

Customers want personalised service that’s available around the clock and streamlined service no matter what channel they use. It’s a hefty payoff — more and more customers actually let customer experience guide who they buy from. To meet the mark, retailers must shift not only their mindset and priorities but also their approach.

Small and mighty customer service teams can deliver high-quality customer experiences that match the efforts of much larger teams — and it’s time they do.

Customers have signalled loud and clear that they won’t settle for mediocre. With just a few tweaks (and a little elbow grease), your small company can start driving the best-in-class customer experiences that maximise growth — starting today.

Tech companies may be leading the digital transformation charge, but a surprising number aren’t well-positioned to deliver the best-in-class service that keeps customers coming back.

According to our research: only a third of tech business respondents strongly believe their company is investing enough in support initiatives; and only 27% of agents say they currently feel empowered to do their jobs well.

Travel is back — and with the surge in bookings comes a rush of customers that expect better service at every turn.

61% of customers say they now have higher expectations, which means that travel and hospitality companies will have to work extra hard to impress them. Big or small, digitally-savvy or not, all travel and hospitality businesses can take steps to build top-notch service operations that grow the business and build lasting relationships with customers.

“Where human interactions are concerned, it’s quality, not quantity that ultimately matters most. Quality customer service interactions are essential and what ultimately impact a customer relationship most, regardless of how many tickets you process in a given day.”

ADRIAN MCDERMOTT,
CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER, ZENDESK

Customers have signalled loud and clear that they want more from the companies they buy from. And while customer service leaders have long prioritised speedy responses and quick answers, in reality they must go far beyond that. To deliver truly great service, businesses must shift not only their mindset and priorities, but also their approach.

With so much at stake, companies must act quickly to deliver the quality experiences that customers want and expect. Why? Research shows that you may only have a few chances to impress customers before they’re gone, perhaps for good. So, where to start and what to prioritise? Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time:

Urgency is mounting on all sides. 61% of customers are saying the pandemic raised their customer service expectations. And, higher than other industries, 57% of financial service firms see a strong link between delivering great customer service and improving cross-sell revenues:

  • 76% of customers expect to engage with someone immediately after contacting a company;

  • 64% say that customer service feels like an afterthought for most businesses they interact with; yet

  • 68% expect all experiences to be personalised.

Not only do customers want faster, unified, personalised support over a wide range of available channels, but they also need the most advanced security measures to ensure that their private data remains safe. It’s a tall order for any financial business and to deliver truly great service, financial companies must shift not only their mindset and priorities but also their approach. For established players, this means modernising their systems just to keep up.

With so much at stake, financial businesses must act quickly in making the changes necessary to keep clients coming back. Why? Research shows that you may only have a few chances to impress them before they’re gone, perhaps for good. So, where to start and what to prioritise?

Customers want more from the government agencies they engage with, but it’s a wide gap between expectations and reality. Government agencies actually ranked last for customer satisfaction in a McKinsey benchmarking survey, compared to 10 other industries. And though they lag behind the private sector when it comes to delivering high-quality customer experiences, one thing is clear: business-as-usual simply isn’t enough. To deliver truly great service that benefits constituents, their own support teams and their overarching mission, government organisations must shift not only their mindset and priorities but also their approach.

With so much at stake, government organisations must act quickly to deliver the quality experiences that customers want and expect. Why? Studies show a direct link between trust and a satisfactory digital experience. If a government offers easy-to-use, secure digital services, residents tend to have a higher trust score of their government.

With people increasingly “shopping” for care by reading online reviews and ratings, healthcare providers must shift their focus to delivering higher-quality experiences each and every time. No matter where you are on your customer service journey, we’ve identified some key steps that can help you stand out from other providers and build lasting relationships with your patients.

With so much at stake, healthcare businesses must act quickly to deliver the quality experiences that people want and expect. Why? Research shows that you may only have a few chances to impress them before they’re gone, perhaps for good. So, where to start and what to prioritize?

It’s clear that customers want more from the companies they buy from — personalisation, channel choice and always-on support are just a few at the top of the wish list. And while customer service leaders have long prioritised speedy responses and quick answers, in reality they must go far beyond that. To deliver truly great service, enterprise businesses must shift not only their mindset and priorities but also their approach.

There’s a good reason for doing so. Recent Zendesk research shows that larger companies with more mature customer service operations are:

  • 10.8 times more likely to exceed customer satisfaction goals;

  • 3.3 times more likely to have grown their customer base; and

  • 3 times more likely to operate a profitable service team.

With so much at stake, companies must act quickly to deliver the quality experiences that customers want and expect. Why? Research shows that you may only have a few chances to impress customers before they’re gone, perhaps for good. And with more and more customers factoring experience into their buying decisions, even companies with a loyal following should be paying attention.

To boost customer value and loyalty, manufacturers must set themselves apart. And the research is in — exceptional experiences keep customers coming back:

  • 81% of customers say that a positive customer service experience makes them more likely to make another purchase; and

  • 70% say they base purchasing decisions on the quality of a company’s customer service.

Customers now expect some form of personalisation with each interaction; they want to be able to reach out in whichever manner they choose — via social media, text message or a live chat session, just to name a few — and they expect agents to have all the information they need at their fingertips. Unfortunately, only 16% of manufacturing customer service agents report feeling empowered to do their job effectively. To meet the mark, manufacturing businesses must shift not only their mindset and priorities but also their approach.

With so much at stake, manufacturing companies must act quickly to deliver the quality experiences that customers want and expect. Why? Research shows that you may only have a few chances to impress customers before they’re gone, perhaps for good. So, where to start and what to prioritise?

Customers today know what they want — and what they don’t want — from their interactions with companies. With the rise of digital communication tools, social media and messaging, customers expect on-demand, personalised and effortless service. Fall short of these expectations and they’re increasingly likely to take their business elsewhere. What’s more, recent Zendesk research shows that midsized and larger companies with more mature customer service operations are:

  • 10.8 times more likely to exceed customer satisfaction goals;

  • 3.3 times more likely to have grown their customer base; and

  • 3 times more likely to operate a profitable service team.

Here’s another reason to prioritise great customer experiences: retailers with a strong omnichannel presence and digital footprint are pulling ahead of their competitors, according to a recent McKinsey study. And as the gap between leaders and laggards widens, it’s in everybody’s interest to ensure high-quality experiences are at the top of every company’s wish list.

Retailers are feeling the pressure to act quickly to deliver the quality experiences that customers want and expect. Why? Research shows you may only have a few chances to impress customers before they’re gone, perhaps for good. Impressing customers has never been more of a challenge. From supply chain disruptions to drastic changes in buyer behaviour, the retail landscape continues to evolve:

  • 68% of customers now expect all interactions to be personalised; and

  • 70% make their purchasing decisions based on the quality of customer service.

  • Yet, less than 50% of organisations feel they have the ability to adapt their customer service technology solution to change

In a world where continuous connectivity, immediate gratification and public reviews are the norm, retailers must provide an exceptional shopping experience that crosses channels, anticipates customer needs, and ensures a smooth journey to drive sales and develop lasting customer loyalty. So, where to start and what to prioritise?

Customer service leaders have long prioritised speedy responses and quick answers but, in reality, they must go far beyond that. To deliver truly great service, businesses of all sizes must shift not only their mindset and priorities, but also their approach.

With so much at stake, small companies must act quickly to deliver the quality experiences that customers want and expect. Why? Research shows that you may only have a few chances to impress customers before they’re gone, perhaps for good. So, where to start and what to prioritise?

According to our research:

  • only a third of tech business respondents strongly believe their company is investing enough in support initiatives; and

  • only 27% of agents say they currently feel empowered to do their jobs well.

It’s no easy task to wow customers — especially with expectations now sky-high — but tech companies that prioritise streamlined, personalised experiences at every turn can boost their visibility with customers and unlock new opportunities for growth.

With so much at stake, tech companies must act quickly in making any changes necessary to improve their service experience. Why? Research shows that you may only have a few chances to impress customers before they’re gone, perhaps for good. So, where to start and what to prioritise?

Customers are increasingly engaging online and expect interactions to feel effortless and personal—from agents ready and equipped with information about their booking or inquiry, to the ability to connect over whatever channel they prefer. With loyalty up for grabs, there’s only a short window of time to get it right before they’re gone, perhaps for good. This means that travel and hospitality companies must act quickly to deliver the quality experiences that customers want and expect. So, where to start and what to prioritize?

Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time.

Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time:

So, where to start and what to prioritise? Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time:

Here’s how to create quality experiences, every time:

So, where to start and what to prioritise? Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time:

Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time:

Such a clear link between higher-quality customer service and better business outcomes should have all midsized businesses paying attention. Here’s where to start and what to prioritise to create better customer experiences, each and every time:

Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time:

Here’s how small businesses can punch above their weight by creating quality customer experiences, every time:

Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time:

Here’s how to create quality customer experiences, every time:

Get senior leadership on board, immediately

For too long, customer service initiatives have remained buried within organisations and behind the scenes, instead of front and centre with leadership teams. This, stresses McDermott, is a major problem. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product and the experience you provide to your customers”, he says.
For too long, customer service initiatives have remained siloed within financial institutions instead of front and centre with leadership teams. This, stresses McDermott, is a major problem. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product and the experience you provide to your customers”, he says.
For too long, customer service initiatives have remained buried within government organisations instead of front and centre with leadership teams. This, stresses McDermott, is a major problem. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your organisation, and the experience you provide to the public,” he says.
For too long, customer service initiatives have remained buried within healthcare organisations instead of front and centre with leadership teams. This, stresses McDermott, is a major problem, especially as patients increasingly have choices when it comes to selecting their care. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product, and the experience you provide,” he says.
For too long, customer service initiatives have remained buried within organisations and behind the scenes, instead of front and centre with leadership teams. This, stresses McDermott, is a major problem. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product and the experience you provide to your customers”, he says.
As a sizable number of manufacturing companies transform their business models and, in some cases, their customer base, the need for top-notch service has become paramount. Even so, customer service initiatives have remained buried within manufacturing organisations instead of front and centre with leadership teams. This, stresses McDermott, is a major problem. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product and the experience you provide to your customers”, he says.
Simply saying that customer service is important isn’t enough. Instead, customer service data and insights should be front and centre with leadership teams. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product and the experience you provide to your customers,” says McDermott.
For too long, customer service initiatives have remained siloed within retail organisations and behind the scenes instead of front and centre with leadership teams. This, stresses McDermott, is a major problem. 70% make their purchasing decisions based on the quality of customer service.
No two small companies are alike, but all can relate to facing competing priorities and limited resources. Whatever stage you might be at, McDermott stresses the importance of keeping customer service front and centre with leadership teams. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product and the experience you provide to your customers”, he says.
Simply saying that customer service is important isn’t enough. Customer service data and insights must be front and centre with leadership teams. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product and the experience you provide to your customers,” says McDermott.
It’s time to bring customer service initiatives front and centre with leadership teams, instead of leaving them siloed or buried deep within the organisation. This, stresses McDermott, should be a major priority. “Customer service should live in every nook and cranny of your company, your product and the experience you provide to your customers”, he says.

To bring customer service to the forefront, businesses must:

To bring customer service to the forefront, financial businesses must:

To bring customer service to the forefront, government organisations must:

To bring customer service to the forefront, healthcare businesses must:

To bring customer service to the forefront, enterprise businesses must:

To bring customer service to the forefront, manufacturing businesses must:

To bring customer service to the forefront, midsized businesses must:

To elevate the role of customer service within their company, retailers must:

With 70% of customers now basing who they buy from on the quality of customer service they receive, no small business can afford to settle for 'good enough'. To bring customer service to the forefront, companies must:

To bring customer service to the forefront, businesses must:

To bring customer service to the forefront, businesses must:

Hold leaders accountable: Establish a core team and assign a senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives.

Incentivise quality improvements: Advocate that compensation of senior leaders be tied directly to customer service performance to ensure buy-in at the highest levels.

Benchmark performance: Track customer service performance relative to others in the industry to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for improving customer service quality and frequently monitor performance to make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leadership in the loop: Ensure the core team provides regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger company policy and strategy.

Elevate standing among leadership: Establish a core team and assign a senior leader focused on increasing visibility and weaving customer service into the company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives.

Incentivise quality improvements: Advocate that compensation of senior leaders be tied directly to customer service performance to ensure buy-in at the highest levels.

Benchmark performance: Track customer service performance relative to other financial institutions to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for improving customer service quality and frequently monitor performance to make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leadership in the loop: Ensure the core team provides regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger company policy and strategy.

Hold leaders accountable: Appoint a core team and senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the organisation’s larger strategic roadmap and objectives.

Prioritise customer service investments: Survey findings show that trust in the government is directly tied to easy-to-use and secure digital services. Invest in an excellent digital experience to improve constituent trust.

Clearly define goals for quality: Monitor key customer service indicators relative to other government organisations (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for improving performance and frequently track performance to make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leadership in the loop: Ensure the core team provides regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger organisation policy and strategy.

Hold leaders accountable: Establish a core team and assign a senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives.

Incentivise quality improvements: Advocate that compensation of senior leaders be directly tied to patient outcomes and satisfaction to ensure buy-in at the highest levels.

Benchmark performance: Track customer service performance relative to other healthcare providers to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for improving patient satisfaction and frequently monitor performance to make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leadership in the loop: Ensure the core team provides regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger company policy and strategy.

Give service a seat in the C-suite: Establish a core team and assign a senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives.

Incentivise action: Advocate that compensation of senior executives be tied directly to customer service performance to ensure buy-in at the highest levels.

Benchmark performance: Track your customer service performance relative to others in your industry to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for improving customer service quality and frequently monitor performance to make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leadership in the loop: Ensure the core team provides regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger company policy and strategy.

Put customer service at the centre: Establish a core team and assign a senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives.

Incentivise quality improvements: Advocate that compensation of senior leaders be tied directly to customer service performance to ensure buy-in at the highest levels.

Benchmark performance: Track your customer service performance relative to other manufacturers to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for improving customer service quality and frequently monitor performance to make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leadership in the loop: Ensure the core team provides regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger company policy and strategy.

Promote customer service to the C-suite: Assign a senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the larger company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives. Consider having them oversee a core team working toward making customer service a competitive advantage in 2022.

Incentivize quality improvements: Find ways to get buy-in at the highest levels, such as directly tying the compensation of senior leaders to customer service performance or outcomes.

Benchmark performance: Track customer service performance relative to your peers to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for improving customer service quality, and frequently monitor performance to make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leaders looped in: Have the customer service team provide regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. According to our recent research, midsized and larger companies with the most mature CX operations are 4.4 times more likely to be reviewing service performance metrics daily.

Lead with a customer-first mindset: Develop a core team to bridge gaps between the customer service and leadership teams to ensure that customer service data and insights are woven into the company’s strategic roadmap and tied to business objectives.

Incentivise quality improvements: Advocate that compensation of senior leaders be tied directly to customer service performance to ensure buy-in at the highest levels.

Benchmark performance: Track the service indicators most important to customers and compare your performance relative to other retailers to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), stay on top of changes to customer preferences, define goals for improving service quality and make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leadership in the loop: Ensure the core team provides regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger company policy and strategy.

Engage the leadership team: Assign a senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives.

Incentivise quality improvements: Find ways to get buy-in at the highest levels, such as directly tying the compensation of senior leaders to customer service performance.

Benchmark performance: Track customer service performance relative to others in the industry to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for improving customer service quality and frequently monitor performance to make adjustments, as needed, in real time.

Keep leaders looped in: Have the customer service team provide regular updates to leadership so they’re aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. According to our recent research, small companies with the most mature CX organisations are six times more likely to be reviewing service performance metrics daily.

Connect the dots between customer service and leadership: Establish a core team and assign a senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives.

Incentivise quality improvements: Advocate that compensation of senior leaders be tied directly to customer service performance to ensure buy-in at the highest levels.

Benchmark performance and set goals: Track customer service performance relative to tech companies to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark), define goals for boosting quality and make needed adjustments in real time.

Provide regular updates: Ensure the core team keeps leadership aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger company policy and strategy.

Connect customer service to leadership: Establish a core team and assign a senior leader focused on weaving customer service into the company’s strategic roadmap and business objectives.

Incentivise quality improvements: Find ways to promote buy-in at the highest levels. Consider advocating for compensation of senior leaders to be directly tied to customer service performance.

Benchmark performance: Track customer service performance relative to other travel and hospitality companies to get a baseline (which can easily be done by using the Zendesk Benchmark). Define goals for quality improvements and frequently monitor indicators to make adjustments as needed.

Provide regular updates: Ensure the core team keeps leadership aware of evolving customer service plans and metrics. Create opportunities for customer service insights to play a greater role in larger company policy and strategy.

Chapter 6 clock chart check

Make the business case for quality customer service

When measuring customer service performance, companies tend to take a narrow view by focusing solely on metrics like Customer Satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to focus on things like customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today”, says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, financial businesses tend to take a narrow view by focusing solely on traditional metrics like customer satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to focus on bigger-picture indicators like customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today”, says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, government organisations tend to take a narrow view by focusing solely on tickets solved. By widening the scope to focus on things like cost and time savings, they can better understand the impact of customer service on operational efficiency.
“Being able to tie customer service to efficiency is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today,” says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, companies tend to take a narrow view by focusing solely on metrics like Customer Satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to focus on bigger-picture indicators like retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today”, says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, companies tend to take a narrow view by focusing solely on metrics like Customer Satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to include bigger-picture indicators like customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today”, says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, manufacturing companies tend to take a narrow view by focusing solely on metrics like customer satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to include indicators that track customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand their customers and the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today”, says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, companies tend to take a narrow view by focusing solely on traditional metrics like customer satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to include bigger-picture indicators like customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today”, says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, retailers often take a narrow view by focusing solely on metrics like customer satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to focus on bigger-picture indicators like customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today,” says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, small companies tend to take a narrow view by focusing solely on metrics like customer satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to focus on bigger-picture indicators like customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today”, says McDermott.
When assessing customer service performance, tech companies tend to focus heavily on customer satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to include metrics like customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today”, says McDermott.
When measuring customer service performance, companies tend to focus heavily on metrics like customer satisfaction (CSAT). By widening the scope to focus on things like customer retention and loyalty, they can better understand the impact of customer service on the bottom line. “Being able to tie customer service to business growth is incredibly valuable and often what is needed to get leadership backing and the investment in customer service that they don’t have today,” says McDermott.

To make the business case for quality, companies should:

To make the business case for quality service, financial firms should:

To make the case for quality service, government organisations should:

To make the business case for quality service, healthcare companies should:

To make the business case for quality service, enterprise companies should:

To make the business case for quality service, manufacturers should:

To make the business case for quality service, midsized companies should:

To make the business case for quality service, retailers should:

To make the business case for quality service, small companies should:

To make the business case for quality, companies should:

To make the business case for quality service, travel and hospitality companies should:

Chapter 6 stars

Focus on business impact: Create opportunities for agents to drive profits through upselling and cross-selling, informed by a deep understanding of the customer’s immediate needs. Establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents to make the link between customer service and business growth more tangible.

Track data beyond CSAT: Identify and track key metrics associated with quality customer service. Most organisations start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Integrate systems: Integrate customer service and CRM platforms to monitor changes in customers and their lifetime value. Sharing data between these platforms can create more opportunities for personalised, relevant solutions to customer issues that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Review performance frequently: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal low-hanging fruit and other opportunities to iterate on ways to improve customer service quality.

Monitor their relationships with clients: Identify and track the metrics that best capture quality customer service. Most organisations start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Focus on business impact: Create opportunities for agents to drive profits through upselling and cross-selling, informed by a deep understanding of the client’s immediate needs. Establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents can make the link between customer service and business growth more tangible.

Review performance frequently: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal low-hanging fruit and other opportunities to iterate on ways to improve customer service quality.

Look beyond solved tickets: Fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time and average handle time can create multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Integrate systems: You can easily streamline communication and data sharing by integrating your customer service and government platforms. Doing so can also lead to the discovery of personalised, relevant answers to constituent questions that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Conduct regular performance reviews: Weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding customer satisfaction can reveal low-hanging fruit and other opportunities to iterate on ways to improve constituent trust and customer service quality.

Track data beyond CSAT: Identify and track key metrics associated with quality customer service. Most providers start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Focus on business impact: Create opportunities for agents to deepen relationships through upselling and cross-selling, informed by a thorough understanding of patient needs. Establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents can make the link between customer service and business growth more tangible.

Review performance frequently: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal opportunities to improve customer service quality and drive growth.

Focus on larger business impact: Create opportunities for agents to drive profits through upselling and cross-selling, informed by a deep understanding of the customer’s immediate needs. Establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents can make the link between customer service and business growth more tangible.

Track data beyond CSAT: Identify and track key metrics associated with quality customer service. Most teams start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Integrate platforms: Integrate customer service and CRM platforms to monitor changes in customers and their lifetime value. Sharing data between these platforms can create more opportunities for personalised, relevant solutions to customer issues that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Review performance frequently: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal low-hanging fruit and other opportunities to iterate on ways to improve customer service quality.

Focus on business impact: Create opportunities for agents to drive profits through upselling and cross-selling, informed by a deep understanding of the customer’s immediate needs. Establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents so the the link between customer service and business growth is more tangible.

Track data beyond CSAT: Identify and track key metrics associated with quality customer service. Most companies start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Integrate platforms: Integrate customer service and CRM platforms to monitor changes in customers and their lifetime value. Sharing data between these platforms can create more opportunities for personalised, relevant solutions to customer issues that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Review performance frequently: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal opportunities to improve customer service quality and drive growth.

Focus on larger business impact: Create opportunities for agents to drive profits through upselling and cross-selling, informed by a deep understanding of the customer’s immediate needs. Establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents can make the link between customer service and business growth more tangible.

Get better data visibility: Identify and track key metrics associated with quality customer service. Most teams start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) can give fast-growing companies better visibility over the business and relationships with customers.

Integrate platforms: Integrate customer service and CRM platforms to monitor changes in customer behaviour and their lifetime value. A unified solution enables companies to improve service quality and identify personalised, relevant solutions to customer issues that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Review performance frequently: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal opportunities to improve customer service quality.

Monitor customer relationships: Identify and track key metrics associated with quality customer service. Most organisations start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your relationship with customers.

Focus on business impact: Create opportunities for agents to drive profits through upselling and cross-selling, informed by a deep understanding of the customer’s immediate needs. In addition to integrating customer service and sales data, retailers should establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents so the link between customer service and business growth is more tangible.

Review performance frequently: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal low-hanging fruit and other opportunities to iterate on ways to improve customer service quality.

Focus on immediate ROI: Create opportunities for support agents to drive profits through upselling and cross-selling, informed by a deep understanding of the customer’s needs. Establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents to make the link between customer service and business growth more tangible.

Look beyond CSAT: Identify and monitor key metrics associated with quality customer service. Most small companies start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Optimise systems: Making do with a limited budget often means settling for ad hoc systems that don’t connect. By integrating customer service and CRM platforms, for instance, companies can monitor changes in customers and their lifetime value. Sharing data between these platforms can also lead to the discovery of personalised, relevant solutions to customer issues that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Review performance frequently: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal low-hanging fruit and other opportunities to iterate on ways to improve customer service quality.

Empower agents to grow the business: Help agents recognise opportunities to pass to the sales team or drive their own profits through upselling and cross-selling. In some cases, agents can also be a great resource to lead customer demos and answer prospect questions. Companies may also want to establish a separate profit and loss statement to better capture revenue generated by agents so the link between customer service and business growth is more tangible.

Collect data that provides a bigger-picture view: Identify and track key metrics associated with quality customer service. Most organisations start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Integrate platforms: Integrate customer service and CRM platforms to monitor changes in customers and their lifetime value. Sharing data between these platforms can create more opportunities for personalised, relevant solutions to customer issues that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Conduct regular performance reviews: Review key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections weekly to reveal opportunities for quality improvements.

Empower agents to drive revenue: Create opportunities for agents to upsell and cross-sell, informed by a deep understanding of the customer’s immediate needs. Establish a separate profit and loss statement that captures revenue generated by agents can make the link between customer service and business growth more tangible.

Track metrics that speak to the larger experience: Identify and track key data points associated with quality customer service. Most organisations start with CSAT, but fostering an organisation-wide understanding of the importance of indicators like first response time, average handle time, Net Promoter Score (NPS) and Customer Effort Score (CES) creates multiple lenses for viewing the quality and progress of your customer experience efforts.

Integrate platforms: Integrate customer service and CRM platforms to monitor changes in customers and their lifetime value. Sharing data between these platforms can create more opportunities for personalised, relevant solutions to customer issues that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Conduct regular reviews: Reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections weekly to reveal opportunities to improve customer service quality.

Take actions that will directly boost quality and business results

It’s impossible for companies to offer high-quality customer experiences if their agents are bogged down by cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible for financial businesses to offer high-quality customer experiences if their agents are bogged down by legacy systems, cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible for government organisations to offer high-quality customer experiences if their agents are bogged down by cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible for healthcare providers to offer high-quality patient experiences if their agents are bogged down by cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible for companies to offer high-quality customer experiences if their agents are bogged down by siloed legacy workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible for manufacturing businesses to offer high-quality customer experiences if their agents are bogged down by cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible to offer high-quality customer experiences if agents are bogged down by siloed legacy workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible for retailers to offer high-quality customer experiences if their agents are bogged down by cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible for small companies to offer high-quality customer experiences if their agents are bogged down by cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible for tech companies to offer high-quality customer experiences if their agents are bogged down by cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, they can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”
It’s impossible to offer high-quality customer experiences if agents are bogged down by cumbersome workflows or inefficient processes. What’s more, agents can’t deliver on promises of personalised, tailored service if they have to spend valuable time hunting around for data that they should already have.

“To have the context they need to create a high-quality experience, agents need to know who the customer is, where they’re coming from, and what their issue might be”, McDermott says. “Having this information at their fingertips makes this possible.”

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and customers alike, companies should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and customers alike, financial companies should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and constituents alike, government organisations should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and patients alike, healthcare companies should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and customers alike, enterprise companies should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and customers alike, manufacturers should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and customers alike, midsized companies should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and customers alike, companies should focus on:

To match the high-quality experiences of a much larger team, small companies should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and customers alike, tech companies should focus on:

To promote high-quality experiences for agents and customers alike, travel and hospitality companies should focus on:

Automating repetitive tasks: Identify and automate the most repetitive tasks to free up agents’ time and improve performance.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills, including product knowledge, and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Personalisation: Give agents access to valuable customer information — beyond just the customer’s name — that they can use to improve experiences. Start with providing details about their recent purchase.

Customisation: Actively solicit feedback from agents and managers about the quality of tools used and the overall process to personalise the customer service experience.

Evaluating existing channels: Ensure that you have satisfaction metrics linked to each and every channel. Actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Integrate systems: Integrate data across business systems to give agents a complete view of the client’s details. By connecting customer service and CRM platforms, firms can monitor changes in customers and their lifetime value. Sharing data between these platforms can create more opportunities for personalised, relevant solutions to customer issues that otherwise wouldn’t be considered.

Automate and streamline workflows: Identify and automate repetitive tasks to free up agents’ time and improve performance. Start by automating ticket creation and CTI screen pop. You may also want to consider adding advanced routing to get technical questions to the right agent or send common questions to existing self-service resources.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills, including product knowledge, and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Personalisation: Give agents access to valuable customer information — beyond just the client’s name — right in their workspace so that they can begin personalising experiences. Consider integrating ancillary service offerings such as cashback deals to help boost retention.

Add and evaluate existing channels: Offer online and mobile channels to simplify the client’s journey. Actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Automating for efficiency: Identify and automate parts of the support workflow to free up agents’ time and improve performance. For government organisations, enabling Knowledge Capture puts relevant help centre articles at agents’ fingertips, while improving the content over time. State CIOs also say that chatbots are here to stay; these virtual agents can help boost team efficiency by managing simple online requests for assistance.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Personalisation: Give agents access to critical constituent information — beyond just the constituent’s name — that they can use to improve experiences. Start with providing details about their most recent engagement.

Modernising their channel mix: Start by getting a better understanding of how your constituents prefer to reach out. Consider adding digital channels beyond an email inbox. Regularly benchmark key metrics across channels to track performance and ensure quality improvements.

Get a complete view of the patient: Centralise patient data from employee health records (EHRs), medical devices, schedules and more into one view to allow providers and agents to deliver patient-centric care by improving quality and speed of service.

Stay connected from anywhere: Deepen patient relationships and build trust by providing support over any device — including web, mobile and social apps — so patients can always reach you. Build an integrated help centre that utilises machine learning so patients can quickly connect to relevant information without having to wait.

Automating repetitive tasks: Identify and automate the most repetitive tasks and processes to free up agents’ time and improve performance. Leverage advanced routing that collects critical patient information and reduces manual data entry so that tickets get to the right agent based on their skill set, availability and priority.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Evaluating existing channels: Ensure that you have satisfaction metrics linked to each and every channel. Actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Connecting disparate systems: The bigger the company, the more complex your operations are. Connect your tools, data and communications across all departments for smoother customer interactions and less wasted time.

Personalisation: Give agents access to valuable customer information — beyond just the customer’s name — that they can use to improve experiences. Start with providing details about their recent purchase.

Automating repetitive tasks: Identify and automate the most routine, simple tasks to free up agents’ time and improve performance. This could include automatically creating tickets, generating responses, routing requests to the right agent or even using AI-powered chatbots to handle common questions or direct customers to relevant help centre articles.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills, including product knowledge, and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Customisation: Actively solicit feedback from agents and managers at regular intervals to determine whether you need to customise your support solution to better fit the unique needs of your business and customers.

Evaluating channel mix: Digital companies have been able to pivot much more quickly than their peers. Consider adding channels like messaging, link satisfaction metrics to each channel you offer, and actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Personalisation: With a dynamic profile of each customer, agents can provide faster, more personalised service. Connect information across disparate systems to capture critical customer data such as order fulfillment, warranty details, loyalty programmes, device failures, repairs or replacements, and more. Integrate all brands, global contact centres and support channels into one service solution to make it easy for agents to have full context of current and previous engagement.

Automating repetitive tasks: Identify and automate the most repetitive tasks to free up agents’ time and improve performance.

Improving workflow inefficiencies: Advanced workflow capabilities such as AI-powered automations, skills-based routing and knowledge management solutions can help to promote self-service, improve collaboration, reduce errors and enable rapid response.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority. Just 34% of manufacturing customer service agents were very satisfied with the quality of training received and 1 in 5 with the frequency of the training. Consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Evaluating existing channels: Ensure that you have satisfaction metrics linked to each and every channel. Actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Automating repetitive tasks: Identify and automate repetitive tasks to free up agents’ time and improve performance. This could include automatically creating tickets, generating responses and routing requests to the right agent.

Connecting disparate systems: Whether you’re starting from scratch or looking to scale, connecting your tools, data and communications across all departments will help to ensure smoother customer interactions and less wasted time. Empowered agents are those that have all of their information and tools in one place and can easily collaborate within or across teams.

Personalisation: Give agents access to valuable customer information — beyond just the customer’s name — that they can use to improve experiences. Start with providing details about their recent purchase or service interaction.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Self-service: There’s nothing quite as empowering for customers as finding quick answers themselves but maintaining a well-functioning help centre is a continuous process. Conduct regular audits of support tickets to identify gaps in content and areas where updates are necessary. Create and implement a system that makes it easier for agents to capture and share knowledge.

Channel mix: Digital companies have been able to pivot much more quickly than their peers. Consider adding channels like messaging, link satisfaction metrics to each channel you offer and actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Integrating systems: Tracking orders is the most common request to retail agents, but many retailers are lagging behind on integrating the platforms needed to ensure a streamlined workflow and fast response. Start by integrating your e-commerce, inventory and delivery platforms. Then consider further integration with your RMA (return, repair, exchange) and sales systems. This can easily be done with Agent Workspace.

Omnichannel and digital support: Omnichannel support is foundational to high customer satisfaction and digital retailers have been able to pivot much easier than their peers. Consider adding digital channels like messaging if you haven’t already and actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Automating repetitive tasks: Customers are reaching out for support more than ever, which means that retailers need to balance increased ticket volumes without the budget for more staff. Identify and automate the most repetitive tasks to free up agents’ time and improve performance.

Education and training: The majority of customers feel like businesses could do a better job of training their agents. Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills, including product knowledge, and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Personalisation: Give agents access to valuable customer information — beyond just the customer’s name — that they can use to improve experiences. Start with providing details about their recent purchase. This can potentially increase not only customer satisfaction but also lifetime value, which is a critical metric for any company chasing growth.

Streamlining workflows: To match the might of much larger teams, smaller companies can’t have their agents bogged down with repetitive, manual processes. Identifying, automating and optimising workflows can help to free up agents’ time and improve performance.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills, including product knowledge, and then advances agent knowledge at regular intervals.

Personalisation: Connect all systems and data sources under one unified hub. This gives agents access to valuable customer information — beyond just the customer’s name — that they can immediately use to improve experiences. Start with providing details about their recent purchase.

Scalable solutions: Find a support solution that works out-of-the-box but can also be customised to fit the unique needs of your business and customers. Actively solicit feedback from agents and managers to determine if changes need to be made to improve customer experiences.

Evaluating existing channels: Ensure that you have satisfaction metrics linked to each and every channel. Actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Connecting systems: Only 32% of agents at tech companies say they’re very effective at collaborating or finding the information they need to be effective. Removing these obstacles by connecting back-end systems can help to improve efficiency and performance.

Self-service: Help centres can ease the pressure on agents, while getting faster answers for customers. Conduct an audit of your help centre content to identify gaps and flag existing articles for improvement.

Automating for efficiency: Identify and automate repetitive tasks to free up agents’ time and improve performance. This can include ticket creation, routing to the right agent, automated responses and even macros to allow agents to easily embed help centre content into their responses.

Personalisation: Give agents access to valuable customer information — beyond just the customer’s name — that they can use to improve experiences. Start with providing details about their recent purchase or enquiry.

Channel mix: Consider adding digital channels like messaging, if you haven’t already. Ensure that you have satisfaction metrics linked to each and every channel. Actively track and benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

Automating for efficiency: Identify and automate repetitive tasks to free up agents’ time and improve performance. This could include ticket creation, booking reminders or even travel or activity recommendations.

Connecting disparate systems: Customers want agents to have information readily available, but only 30% of travel support agents say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to respond to customers. Consider integrating your systems for faster, better experiences for customers and agents.

Education and training: Make agent training a priority; consider developing a tiered training plan that starts with basic technical skills, including service knowledge, and then advances agent learning at regular intervals.

Personalisation: Conduct weekly reviews of key performance metrics and corresponding revenue projections that reveal opportunities to improve customer service quality. Start with providing details about their recent booking.

Channel mix: Consider adding messaging or implementing an AI-powered chatbot to manage common questions around booking details, reservation upgrades or cancellations. Track satisfaction metrics for each existing channel and actively benchmark performance across channels to check for continuous improvement.

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