07 Insights

Chapter 7

Insights

Market insights

Mask Group

Small businesses in APAC

Small businesses in Asia-Pacific

The secret ingredient for unlocking growth is building a customer service team that can punch well above its weight. Small, but mighty teams know what customers want and what needs improvement — and the sky’s the limit for those that get it right.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, small businesses in Asia-Pacific need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 71% of customers in the region say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And an equal number would defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but small businesses have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 43% of small businesses in Asia-Pacific gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging well behind what customers expect. In fact, 68% of consumers in the region report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it’s the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 62% of small company leaders in Asia-Pacific agree that customer service is a critical business priority, a surprising 52% report that it’s still not owned by executive leadership. What’s more, only 13% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 20% of small businesses in Asia-Pacific expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 16% of small business respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but only 42% of those working for small companies in Asia-Pacific feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 51% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 94% of customers in the region are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 39% of agents working for small businesses say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 29% of companies say they’ll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Mask Group

Midsized businesses in APAC

Midsized businesses in Asia-Pacific

Midsized companies know that excellent customer service drives differentiation and loyalty — two key ingredients to bottom line growth. Many are already seeing results, but long-term success will depend on how well they navigate decisions around their people, processes and new technologies.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, midsized businesses in Asia-Pacific need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 71% of customers in the region say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And an equal number would defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but midsized companies have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 49% of midsized companies in Asia-Pacific gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging well behind what customers expect. In fact, 68% of consumers in the region report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it’s the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 70% of midsized business leaders in Asia-Pacific agree that customer service is a critical business priority, a surprising 46% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 19% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 32% of midsized companies in Asia-Pacific expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 26% of midsized business respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but a mere 11% of those working for midsized companies in Asia-Pacific feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 36% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 94% of customers in the region are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 16% of agents working for midsized companies say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 36% of companies say they’ll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Insights emea

Small businesses in Europe

Small businesses in Europe

The secret ingredient for unlocking growth is building a customer service team that can punch well above its weight. Small, but mighty teams know what customers want and what needs improvement — and the sky’s the limit for those that get it right.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, small businesses in Europe need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 47% of customers in the region say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And half would defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but small companies have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 57% of small businesses in Europe gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging well behind what customers expect. In fact, 44% of consumers in the region report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it’s the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 66% of small company leaders in Europe agree that customer service is a critical business priority, a surprising 45% report that it’s still not owned by executive leadership. What’s more, only 16% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 28% of small businesses in Europe expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 21% of small business respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but only 38% of those working for small companies in Europe feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 34% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 84% of customers in the region are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 25% of agents working for small businesses say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 21% of companies say they’ll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Insights emea

Midsized businesses in Europe

Midsized businesses in Europe

Midsized companies know that excellent customer service drives differentiation and loyalty — two key ingredients to bottom line growth. Many are already seeing results, but long-term success will depend on how well they navigate decisions around their people, processes and new technologies.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, midsized businesses in Europe need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 47% of customers in the region say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And half would defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but midsized companies have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 57% of midsized businesses in Europe gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging well behind what customers expect. In fact, 44% of consumers in the region report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it’s the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 65% of midsized company leaders in Europe agree that customer service is a critical business priority, a surprising 40% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 14% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 36% of midsized businesses in Europe expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 20% of midsized business respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but only 27% of those working for midsized companies in Europe feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 45% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 84% of customers in the region are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 18% of agents working for midsized businesses say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 26% of companies say they’ll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Insights emea

Enterprise businesses in Europe

Enterprise businesses in Europe

Enterprise companies know that exceptional customer experiences are the key to growth — both now and in the future. With only a slim margin for error, customer service teams must take the lead in transforming their business to drive real, measurable results.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, enterprise businesses in Europe need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 47% of customers in the region say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And half would defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but enterprise companies have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 59% of enterprise businesses in Europe gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging well behind what customers expect. In fact, 44% of consumers in the region report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it’s the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 69% of enterprise company leaders in Europe agree that customer service is a critical business priority, a surprising 47% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 22% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 34% of enterprise businesses in Europe expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 21% of enterprise business respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but only 29% of those working for enterprise companies in Europe feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 43% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 84% of customers in the region are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 23% of agents working for enterprise businesses say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 29% of companies say they’ll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Latam

Small businesses in Latin America

Small businesses in Latin America

The secret ingredient for unlocking growth is building a customer service team that can punch well above its weight. Small, but mighty teams know what customers want and what needs improvement — and the sky’s the limit for those that get it right.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, small businesses in Latin America need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 70% of customers in the region say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And a similar number (71%) would defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but small companies have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 63% of small businesses in Latin America gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging well behind what customers expect. In fact, 43% of consumers in the region report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it’s the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 92% of small company leaders in Latin America agree that customer service is a critical business priority, a surprising 39% report that it’s still not owned by executive leadership. What’s more, only 26% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with nearly half of small businesses in Latin America expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 34% of small business respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but only half of those working for small companies in Latin America feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 48% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 97% of customers in the region are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just half of agents working for small businesses say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet these expectations. To get there, 23% of companies say they’ll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Latam

Midsized businesses in Latin America

Midsized businesses in Latin America

Midsized companies know that excellent customer service drives differentiation and loyalty — two key ingredients to bottom line growth. Many are already seeing results, but long-term success will depend on how well they navigate decisions around their people, processes and new technologies.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, midsized businesses in Latin America need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 70% of customers in the region say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And a similar number (71%) would now defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but midsized companies have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 68% of midsized businesses in Latin America gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging well behind what customers expect. In fact, 43% of consumers in the region report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it’s the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 87% of midsized company leaders in Latin America agree that customer service is a critical business priority, 34% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, less than a third report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 47% of midsized businesses in Latin America expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 46% of midsized business respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but only 40% of those working for midsized companies in Latin America feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 52% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 97% of customers in the region are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 44% of agents working for midsized businesses say they’re very effective at collaboration needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 29% of companies say they’ll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time

Latam

Enterprise businesses in Latin America

Enterprise businesses in Latin America

Enterprise companies know that exceptional customer experiences are the key to growth — both now and in the future. With only a slim margin for error, customer service teams must take the lead in transforming their business to drive real, measurable results.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, enterprise businesses in Latin America need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 70% of customers in the region say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And a similar number (71%) would now defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but enterprise companies have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 69% of enterprise businesses in Latin America gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging well behind what customers expect. In fact, 43% of consumers in the region report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it’s the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 88% of enterprise company leaders in Latin America agree that customer service is a critical business priority, 26% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 27% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 39% of enterprise businesses in Latin America expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 42% of enterprise business respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but just 29% of those working for enterprise companies in Latin America feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 51% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 97% of customers in the region are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 33% of agents working for enterprise businesses say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 35% of companies say they’ll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Industry insights

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Retail

Retail

Retailers understand that the success of their business depends on the success of their customer service teams. Even so, inflexible systems and a lack of data visibility may be holding them back.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, retailers need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 61% of customers globally say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And an equal number would now defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but retailers have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 62% of retailers gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging behind what customers expect. In fact, 54% of consumers report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it's the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 76% of retail leaders agree that customer service is a critical business priority, a surprising 44% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 18% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 26% of retailers expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 31% of retailers strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic. In fact, 83% of retail business leaders agree that they play a vital role in customer retention. But just a third of retail agents feel empowered to do their jobs well. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 90% of customers are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 34% of retail agents say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 30% of retailers say they'll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Financial services

Financial Services

Financial Services

It’s no surprise that financial services companies see the financial incentive to improve customer service. Even so, many still struggle with implementation — from keeping it conversational to deciding what to prioritise next.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, financial businesses need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 61% of customers globally say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And an equal number would now defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but financial businesses have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 64% of financial services companies gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging behind what customers expect. In fact, 54% of consumers report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it's the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 77% of financial leaders agree that customer service is a critical business priority, 30% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 30% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 40% of financial businesses expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 29% of respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic. In fact, 74% of financial business leaders agree that they play a vital role in customer retention. But just a quarter of agents working for financial companies feel empowered to do their jobs well. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 90% of customers are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 29% of financial services agents say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 33% of financial firms say they'll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Manufacturing leaders agree — customer service impacts the bottom line. But many companies are missing the mark when it comes to giving their agents the training and support they need to be effective.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, manufacturing businesses need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 61% of customers globally say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And an equal number would now defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but manufacturers have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 65% of manufacturing companies gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging behind what customers expect. In fact, 54% of consumers report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it's the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 72% of manufacturing leaders agree that customer service is a critical business priority, 33% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 20% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 30% of manufacturing businesses expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 29% of respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but just 16% of those working for manufacturing companies feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, 44% feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 90% of customers are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 28% of manufacturing agents say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 29% of manufacturers say they'll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Tech

Technology

Technology

Tech leaders agree — customer service is the key to unlocking growth. But so far, many teams lack the systems and processes they need to deliver the exceptional experiences that customers want and expect.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, tech businesses need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 61% of customers globally say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And an equal number would now defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but tech companies have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 73% of tech companies gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging behind what customers expect. In fact, 54% of consumers report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it's the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 77% of tech leaders agree that customer service is a critical business priority, 30% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 24% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 46% of tech businesses expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only a third of respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic. In fact, 85% of tech business leaders agree that they play a vital role in customer retention. But just 27% of tech agents feel empowered to do their jobs well. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 90% of customers are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 32% of tech agents say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 31% of tech companies say they'll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Healthcare

Healthcare

Healthcare

Healthcare companies can unlock opportunities for growth — just by delivering better experiences for their customers. Success will depend on buy-in from senior leaders to transform internal systems and drive real bottom-line results.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, healthcare businesses need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for patients and a growth-generating force in its own right. Some 61% of customers globally say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And an equal number would now defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but healthcare businesses have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 56% of healthcare companies gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering may be lagging behind what patients expect. In fact, 54% of consumers report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the companies they engage with. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it's the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 67% of healthcare leaders agree that customer service is a critical business priority, more than half report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 19% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 26% of healthcare businesses expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 23% of respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic, but just 18% of those working for healthcare companies feel empowered to do their jobs well. What’s more, nearly half feel like they aren’t treated as well as others in the organisation. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 90% of customers are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 18% of healthcare agents say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, 31% of healthcare companies say they'll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Travel hospitality

Travel and hospitality

Travel and hospitality

With people travelling again, companies can grow their business — and their bottom lines — just by delivering top-notch customer service. But they must rise to the challenge of meeting higher expectations by transforming the systems and processes that are holding them back.

To jumpstart growth in this new business reality, travel and hospitality businesses need only look to their own customers. Customer service has emerged as a key differentiator between companies, a top consideration for customers and a profit-generating force in its own right. Some 61% of customers globally say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And an equal number would now defect to a competitor after just one bad customer experience.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between standing out or falling behind, but travel and hospitality businesses have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their growth plans:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 68% of travel and hospitality companies gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging behind what customers expect. In fact, 54% of consumers report that customer service feels like an afterthought for most of the businesses they buy from. That’s a problem for those looking to impress customers and keep them coming back.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it's the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 72% of travel and hospitality leaders agree that customer service is a critical business priority, 57% report that it’s still not owned by the C-suite. What’s more, only 18% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the company with active engagement from leadership.

Current investments aren’t enough to support a standout team

Customer engagement is on the rise, with 16% of travel and hospitality businesses expecting a budget increase of at least 25% over the next two years. But budget expectations are falling short of predicted demand, with only 18% of respondents strongly agreeing that they’re adequately investing in support initiatives.

Solution: Go beyond CSAT and track the metrics needed to make the business case for customer service.

Agents are burnt out and feel undervalued

Agents’ roles have become more important and strategic. In fact, 86% of travel and hospitality business leaders agree that they play a vital role in customer retention. But just 26% of travel and hospitality agents feel empowered to do their jobs well. It’s a slippery slope: unhappy agents can quickly turn into dissatisfied customers.

Solution: Take care of your agents by giving them the training, tools and flexibility they need to deliver better experiences for customers.

Disjointed systems confuse customers and halt growth

When agents have to juggle multiple tools, it’s incredibly difficult to capture a single view of the customer. It’s a missed opportunity — as 90% of customers are willing to spend more for personalised experiences, but just 30% of travel and hospitality agents say they’re very effective at finding the information needed to meet those expectations. To get there, a third of companies say they'll need to design and implement new work processes or risk more frustration for everyone involved.

Solution: Connect agents to the information they need to resolve issues more efficiently and grow the business.

Don’t let these common customer service traps hold you back. Benchmark your performance against your peers and see how high-performing companies deliver best-in-class service every time.

Government

Government

Government

It’s finally time for government organisations to think about what comes next. And after more than a year of adapting and responding to unprecedented change, they’re looking ahead to become truly digital-first organisations.

To jumpstart growth in this digital transformation, government organisations need only look to their own customers. Customer service in the private sector has emerged as a key differentiator between companies and a top consideration for customers. Some 61% of customers globally say they now have higher customer service standards after this past year’s crisis. And government agencies are taking note and making strides in their own digital transformation initiatives.

Delivering exceptional customer service can mean the difference between meeting constituent expectations or not, but government entities have to move quickly to avoid common traps that may derail their ability to deliver:

Customer service isn’t wowing customers

Although 55% of government organisations gave themselves high marks for the quality of their service, what they’re offering is lagging behind what customers expect. In fact, 54% of consumers report that customer service often feels like an afterthought. That’s a problem for those looking to provide exceptional service.

Solution: Focus on reducing customer effort, delivering speedier resolutions and boosting the quality of every customer service interaction.

Leadership is all talk, but it's the doing that counts

Going all in on customer service requires buy-in at the top. But whilst 66% of government leaders agree that customer service is a critical priority, 57% report that it’s still not owned at the leadership level. What’s more, only 16% report viewing customer service metrics on a daily basis.

Solution: Infuse a customer service-first mindset across the organisation with active engagement from leadership.